Research Study and Professional Development in Cairo, Egypt

First Published in Wilfrid Laurier Newsletter:

“We don’t want it to end,” states the senior-school educator, sitting on the floor with papers and markers still strewn about. I smile, because I’ve been delivering professional development to educators for 30 years and have never witnessed such enthusiasm. Alas, time is of the essence, the staff bus is leaving, Cairo traffic at rush hour is a nightmare, and security is tight with the president’s residence only a block away. So, vacate the school we must. We quickly pack up the workshop materials and sweep down the magnificent marble staircase into the grand foyer for final farewells. Hugs, selfies, and double cheek kisses.

The Egyptian educators here are as warm and affectionate as they are enthusiastic. A joy to work with. Our two days of professional development with the staff at the Dover American International School in Egypt has sadly come to an end, yet, friendships and bonds have been formed. Facebook and email addresses exchanged. It is not an ending at all. It is a window of opportunity and growth for both the facilitators and the staff. We are all excited, charged, and renewed.

Bruce Alexander, his wife Sherry, myself, Cathy Miyata, and my husband Kaz were invited guests at the Dover American International School through the Educator and Leadership Institute (ELI), a brainchild of Dr. Steve Sider, Associate Professor at Laurier’s Faculty of Education. ELI’s mission is to build teaching and leadership capacity in communities all over the world, including Haiti, Nepal, Ghana, China, and Egypt.

At Dover, Bruce, Sherry, Kaz, and myself each facilitated six workshops to 100 teachers (K-12) focusing on our areas of expertise.

Bruce and Sherry are experts in G Suite applications for education by Google. They had a chance to share their technological experience and demonstrate how to improve student learning with the use of technology.

I am a literacy and drama specialist with a penchant for storytelling and children’s literature. My husband Kaz is a primary specialist who specializes in the reading process. He worked exclusively with the Kindergarten teachers and co-teachers.

Dover is a private international school in El Shorouk, a suburb of Cairo. The building was originally designed to resemble a resort, which explains the magnificence of the structure, manicured grounds, lush courtyard garden and football, tennis and basketball courts. The school Director, Chuck Reid (former education director with the Avon Maitland District School Board in Ontario) and his wife Suzanne Tsuchida (former school principal in the Grand Erie Board) undertook management of the school in 2012. Identifying staff development as a priority, they began their partnership with ELI. In six years, their student enrollment and reputation has quadrupled. Chuck and Suzanne anticipate hosting many more professional teams and also welcome Laurier student teachers seeking an international placement. I highly recommend the experience. Not only were the staff wonderful and the school gorgeous, but our visit also included a guided tour of the pyramids of Giza and Saqqara, the Cairo Museum, shopping at the Khan-El-Khalili Bazaar and of course, a camel ride.

By Dr. Cathy Miyata – Assistant Professor of Literacy, Faculty of Education

My First Academic Article

I belong to a research team at OISE.  We are studying 28 Literacy Teacher Educators from four countries (Canada, U.S., Australia, and UK).  The work is fascinating.  Our first paper from our study has recently been published in the Journal of Education for Teaching.  The paper, A Foot in Many Camps: Literacy Teacher Educators Acquiring Knowledge Across Many Realms and Juggling Multiple Identities, is attached.  So excited!  Let me know what you think!

Foot In Many Camps

Presenting at the OADE Conference

The Ontario Association for the Development of Education Conference was held Feb 21st and 22nd at York University.    Nice setting.  I was presenting with my PhD supervisor on some of our recent research findings regarding the spheres of knowledge literacy teacher educators must develop in and how they go about making the developments happen.  I found it fascinating, so the presentation was easy.  Lots to say. Narrowing it down for a one hour presentation was the hard part.  I tend to find academic presentations a bit dry.  But this wasn’t.  This work is so insightful for new teacher educators, mid and late career teacher educators and administrators of teacher ed programs.   This is one of the most exciting and poignant articles I have ever read, let alone research and write about.  As the research is not published yet, I will not go into detail as of yet.  But thank you to the participants that came to hear us present.  I could tell how excited you were too and that was so encouraging.  More to come, dear reader, more to come.